Forum Posts

ratnadevi2002
Jan 08, 2020
In Cancer
Call for Case Studies(project@dakshamahealth.org) final date of submission 31st Jan 2020​ PATIENT VOICES This track will provide an opportunity to share experience and best practices regarding the engagement of patients and caregivers and the representation of their perspectives in all phases of the cancer control process, from advocacy and awareness-raising to patient-centred healthcare systems. The case studies will also cover community-based interventions, mobilisation of patients and survivors as well the representation of the diversity of patient voices as a critical aspect of the improvement of cancer prevention and control at the local, regional and global levels.Example of themes for the case studies:Patient advocacy – guidelines Patient communication, data & medical information, including in the digital era, Educational needs of the patient community, Opportunities for collaboration amongst patients (programmes, online platforms, etc...)Cultural sensitivities & stigma, Disparities & prevalence of cancer in racial/ethnic minorities, New models for community mobilisation and engagement SURVIVORSHIP AND PATIENT SUPPORT Patient support programs are playing a critical role in assisting cancer patients and ensuring the quality of care along the cancer continuum. This track will provide the opportunity to share case studies about the practical and psychosocial accompaniment of patients and caregivers to ensure access to adapted care and improve patient outcomes, the quality of life and experience during and after the cancer journey. It also includes interventions dedicated to rehabilitation programmes to survivors.Example of themes for the case studies:Access to care. Quality cancer care, Patient navigation programmes, Value in cancer care, Drugs shortages, especially in LMICs, Quality of life – when do we stop treating?Life after cancer, Sexuality and cancer treatment, Patients’ financial considerations, including health insurance concerns, Definition and measurement of patients’ care expectations (service features, accessibility of information, environmental factors, equipment availability and functionality, etc...)The cancer journey for families of cancer patients ORGANISATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ​As organisations, patient support groups are facing specific challenges in terms of developing, maintaining and increasing their activities with a view to achieving their objectives and improving their impact on patients and caregivers. While patient groups are gaining in professionalism and expertise, they are also facing specific challenges such as a higher dependence on volunteerism, access to qualified support providers and increasing needs for expertise in fundraising and advocacy. This track is aiming to provide a platform for sharing case studies on the successes and challenges of organisational aspects of patient support groups. Example of themes for the case studies:Organisational development of patient support groups – how does it work? Impact of shrinking health care resources. Innovative sustainable funding models within today’s limited budgets. Navigating the legal and policy environments for patients and patient support groups. Peer to peer support especially at the leadership level. Educational needs and training opportunities for patient support groups. Educational needs of the professional oncology community. Collaboration across patient support groups, across regions and across diseases
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ratnadevi2002
Jun 10, 2019
In PARKINSONS
Webinar content media
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ratnadevi2002
Apr 06, 2019
In PARKINSONS
www.parkins.co.in sign the petition- http://chng.it/wnLvw94JMP
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ratnadevi2002
Nov 02, 2018
In Rare Diseases
follow this newsletter http://fastbucksindia.com/Responsive_LSD.NEXT/October_2018/Issues/LSD.NEXT-October-2018-Ind.pdf
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ratnadevi2002
Nov 02, 2018
In Youth
http://www.ncdaction.org/what_s_next_catalyzing_the_youth_agenda_post_hlm3?goal=0_1750ef6b4b-7e90ff737b-64419633
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ratnadevi2002
Sep 07, 2018
In PARKINSONS
What is Parkinson's disease? Parkinson's disease affects the way you move. It happens when there is a problem with certain nerve cells in the brain. Normally, these nerve cells make an important chemical called dopamine. Dopamine sends signals to the part of your brain that controls movement. It lets your muscles move smoothly and do what you want them to. When you have Parkinson’s, these nerve cells break down. Then you no longer have enough dopamine, and you have trouble moving the way you want to. Parkinson’s is progressive, which means it gets worse over time. But usually this happens slowly, over a period of many years. And there are good treatments that can help you live a full life. What causes Parkinson's disease? No one knows for sure what makes these nerve cells break down. But scientists are doing a lot of research to look for the answer. They are studying many possible causes, including aging and poisons in the environment. Abnormal genes seem to lead to Parkinson's disease in some people. But so far, there is not enough proof to show that it is inherited. What are the symptoms? The four main symptoms of Parkinson’s are: Tremor, which means shaking or trembling. Tremor may affect your hands, arms, legs, or head. Stiff muscles. Slow movement. Problems with balance or walking. Tremor may be the first symptom you notice. It is one of the most common signs of the disease, although not everyone has it. Tremor often starts in just one arm or leg or only on one side of the body. It may be worse when you are awake but not moving the affected arm or leg. It may get better when you move the limb or you are asleep. In time, Parkinson’s affects muscles all through your body, so it can lead to problems like trouble swallowing or constipation. In the later stages of the disease, a person with Parkinson’s may have a fixed or blank expression, trouble speaking, and other problems. Some people also have a decrease in mental skills (dementia). People usually start to have symptoms between the ages of 50 and 60, but in some people symptoms start earlier. How is Parkinson's disease diagnosed? Your doctor will ask questions about your symptoms and your past health and will do a neurological exam. A neurological exam includes questions and tests that show how well your nerves are working. For example, your doctor will watch how you move, check your muscle strength and reflexes, and check your vision. He or she will also ask questions about your mood. There are no lab tests that can help your doctor know that you have Parkinson’s. But you may have tests to help your doctor rule out other diseases that could be causing your symptoms. For example, you might have an MRI to look for signs of a stroke or brain tumor. How is it treated? At this time, there is no cure for Parkinson's disease. But there are several types of medicines that can control the symptoms and make the disease easier to live with. Levodopa (also called L-dopa) is the best drug for controlling symptoms of Parkinson's disease. But it can cause problems if you use it for a long time or at a high dose. For this reason, many doctors use other medicines to treat people in the early stages of the disease. This lets them delay the use of levodopa and postpone the side effects. You may not even need treatment if your symptoms are mild. Your doctor may wait to prescribe medicines until your symptoms start to get in the way of your daily life. Your doctor will adjust your medicines as your symptoms get worse. You may need to take several medicines to get the best results. In some cases, a treatment called deep brain stimulation may also be used. For this treatment, a surgeon places wires in your brain. They stimulate an area in your brain that affects movement. There are many things you can do at home that can help you stay as independent and healthy as possible. Eat healthy foods. Get the rest you need. Make wise use of your energy. Get some exercise every day. Physical therapy and occupational therapy can also help. How will Parkinson's disease affect my life? Finding out that you have a long-term, progressive disease changes your life forever. It is normal to have a wide range of feelings. You may feel angry, afraid, sad, or worried about what lies ahead. It may help to keep a few things in mind: No one can know for sure how your disease will progress. But usually this disease progresses slowly. Some people live for many years with only minor symptoms, such as a tremor in one hand. Many people who have Parkinson's disease can and do keep working for years. As the disease gets worse, you may need to make changes or use different tools. You can get support to learn ways to adapt. It is important to take an active role in your health care. Learn all you can about the disease. Find a doctor you trust and can work with. Go to all your appointments, and get all the treatment your doctor suggests. Depression is common in people who have Parkinson’s. If you feel very sad or hopeless, talk to your doctor or see a counselor. Antidepressant medicines can help. It can make a big difference to know that you are not alone. Ask your doctor about Parkinson’s support groups, or look for online groups or message boards. Parkinson’s affects more than just the person who has it. It also affects your loved ones. Be sure to include them in your decisions. Help them learn about the disease and get the support they need.
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ratnadevi2002
Sep 07, 2018
In Diabetes
Diabetes Mallietus is a metabolic disorder where the body can not regulate the glucose level in blood, which is the main source of energy.. There are three types of diabetes, type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Symptoms of diabetes are unusual weight loss, sweating, tingling in the feet, weakness, and hunger too(sometimes).. Once affected, the patient has to take oral medication or insulin which helps to regulate the blood glucose. The monitoring method is by regular blood tests. . The burden of diabetes is increasing globally, particularly in developing countries. While the causes are complex, but the increase is in large part due to rapid increases in overweight, including obesity and physical inactivity. There is good evidence that a large proportion of cases of diabetes and its complications can be prevented by a healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco. Come let’s discuss and find the best solution.
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